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Tales from Beyond

Interesting epitaphs

By Thomas D’Agostino
www.tomdagostino.com

Since my last two installments, I received several requests for more interesting epitaphs.  It appears the New England sense of humor spans the ages when it comes to these quirky and cute limericks and verses. No one was impervious to the chisel and hammer’s compensated prose. Family, friends and even disgruntled neighbors often came forth and suggested the final words that were cut into the stones of those who would be interred underneath.

Curious Epitaphs: Final Part

By Thomas D’Agostino

www.tomdagostino.com

This is the final installment of curious and amusing epitaphs that are found about New England. It can be assured there are countless that are not so well known. Perhaps you may wander a local burial ground and find a stone that catches your eye and a bit of prose chiseled upon it that will make you think.

This turf has drunk a widow’s tear,

Three of her husbands slumber here.

 

This one tells a lot:

The Humor on Gravestones: Part II

By Thomas D’Agostino
www.tomdagostino.com

The Puritans certainly loved to write epitaphs. What they did not say in their daily life became the poetry upon the stones of their loved ones. Many took on an amusing tone, versed nicely while telling a short story or limerick of the person buried beneath the stone. These small witty verses often served as a diversion to the darkness of death, putting a lighter side to the inevitable.

The Seer of Rutland

By Thomas D’Agostino

www.tomdagostino.com

The Eddy family of Chittenden found fame in their well-publicized acts of mediumship and séances in their family home. Only five miles south of the Eddys, another man, Solomon W. Jewett, was making waves of his own. By the end of the nineteenth century, both parties had put the otherwise sleepy state of Vermont on the spiritualist map.

The Hessian Hole

By Thomas D'Agostino
www.tomdagostino.com

During the American Revolution, the British employed German mercenaries to assist them in battle. These fearless Hessian soldiers were well-trained crack shots and sided with the English in large numbers. The Americans were well aware of the expert training the Hessians received and were ready for their worst.

William Miller and the Great Reckoning

By Thomas D’Agostino

On October 22, 1844, over a million people gathered on hills, mountaintops, and inside cemeteries singing hymns and praying out loud, waiting the midnight tolling. It was that moment they were told that the Great Reckoning would commence. The sky was to burst open and all the true followers were to be whisked up to heaven while the rest would die by fire.